Texas Conservation Success Stories

Browse our Growing Library of Success Stories

No Jimmy Buffet Here

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The marsh represents more than a good place to fish or a spot to play in the water. The marsh serves as a hurricane buffer, a sort of natural sponge that can absorb just about the worst that nature can throw at the Texas coastline.

 

A Ripple Effect

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Texas Lawyer transformed part of Prairie Creek into a habitat where river otter, white-tailed deer and other wildlife thrive

 

77 Ranch

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77 RanchGary and Sue Price’s 1,900 acre 77 Ranch in Navarro County is designed and run to be both economically and environmentally sustainable. The Prices do not make a business decision without first considering its environmental impact.

 

Anderson Ranch

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Anderson RanchJim Bill Anderson and his family are exceptional stewards of the land, water, and wildlife of Anderson Ranch, which is located in Canadian, Texas in Hemphill County, and is comprised of over 5,000 acres.

 

Blue Mountain Peak Ranch

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Blue Mountain Peak RanchBlue Mountain Peak Ranch was once in a state of disrepair; its poor range health was a result of overgrazing, and the land was heavily dominated by blueberry juniper. When it was purchased by Richard Taylor and his late-wife Sally in 2001, it was their dream to rehabilitate the land to what it was before European settlement ? more live oak savannah grassland in the uplands, and a higher density of woody plants restricted mainly to the draws. For the past eight years, Suzie Paris, Richard and Sally’s longtime friend and now Richard’s partner, has been active in the ranch restoration.

 

Cook's Branch Conservancy

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Cook's Branch ConservancyThe George Mitchell family’s Cook’s Branch Conservancy, which consists of 5,650 acres in southeastern Texas, has been managed for nearly 50 years under a family tradition of conservation and sustainability.

 

Dixon Water Foundation

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Dixon Water FoundationSpread across north central and southwest Texas, the five working ranches owned and managed by Dixon Water Foundation are sights to behold. Their mission, to promote healthy watersheds through sustainable land management to ensure that future generations have the water resources they need, has led to successful restoration of plant diversity, improved watershed conditions and wildlife habitat across all of their ranches.

 

Jack & Jan Cato

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Jack & Jan CatoFor more than three decades, Jack and Jan Cato have tirelessly pursued revitalization efforts on two ranches in two different ecological regions of Texas. Their Buckhollow Ranch is located in Uvalde and Real counties on the Edwards Plateau and the Stockard-Sirianni Ranch is in Frio County in the South Texas Plains eco region.

 

Laborcitas Creek Ranch

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Laborcitas Creek RanchWildlife habitat is flourishing in South Texas thanks to Laborcitas Creek Ranch.

 

Llano Springs Ranch

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Llano Springs RanchThe Llano Springs Ranch, located 20 miles north of Rocksprings in Edwards County, is a true, family-run operation. The 5,100 acre ranch is owned and operated by Dr. Tom G. Vandivier, his children, Tom M. Vandivier and Ann Vandivier Brodnax and their families.

 

Selah, Bamberger Ranch Preserve

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Selah, Bamberger Ranch PreserveJ. David Bamberger’s Selah, Bamberger Ranch Preserve stands as a motivating symbol of the power of private landowner conservation.

 

Temple Ranch

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Temple RanchArthur “Buddy” Temple purchased Temple Ranch, near Lufkin, in 1992. Since that time, Buddy and Ellen Temple, along with ranch operators, Robert and Jenny Sanders, have introduced many beneficial conservation practices.

 

The BigWoods on the Trinity

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The BigWoods on the TrinityDr. Robert McFarlane spent his youth hunting and fishing the lands and waters of the Middle Trinity River near Tennessee Colony. Those memories of the land stayed with him when he left for medical school at Harvard. When he returned, he saw a different landscape. It was fragmented, converted to pasture and farmland, and significantly different from the pristine land he remembered.

 

Treadwell Brady Ranch

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Treadwell Brady RanchThe Treadwell Brady Ranch implements all five of famed conservationist Aldo Leopold’s essential tools: axe, cow, plow, fire and gun. Efforts include habitat management, erosion control, supplemental food, water and shelter for wildlife, predator control, and wildlife population surveys.

 

Winston 8 Ranch

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Winston 8 RanchWhen the Winston family acquired their property just south of Nacogdoches in the 1980s, it was largely land that had been cut and not replanted. Since then, it has been carefully restored and transformed into a showplace on how to produce timber and quality wildlife habitat.

 

Longleaf legacy returns to Texas landscape

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Longleaf LegacyMike Howard is a landowner in Sabine County and is restoring Longleaf Pines on his property.

 

East Texas Landowners Bring Back Longleaf Pines

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Longleaf LegacyThis Success Story highlights East Texas landowner Lloyd Gillespie's efforts to bring back Longleaf Pines to Scrappin' Valley.

 

Simon Winston - A Longleaf Pine Success Story

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Longleaf LegacySimon Winston is restoring Longleaf Pine to his ranch near Nacogdoches Texas. Simon has received technical and financial assistance from many sources including the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Wild Turkey Federation, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Longleaf Taskforce. Simon uses frequent prescribed burns to create favorable wildlife habitat and enhance the longleaf ecosystem

 

Rufus Duncan Longleaf Pine Landowner Success Story

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Longleaf LegacyThis video describes how Rufus Duncan is helping restore the historic Longleaf Pine range at Scrappin' Valley in east Texas.

 

Operation Ponderosa

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In 2014, Texas A&M Forest Service partnered with The Nature Conservancy to begin reforestation efforts on the Davis Mountains Preserve.  Between 2015 and 2016, TFS received a 3-year $200,000 grant from USDA Forest Service for initial forest stand assessments and management prescriptions. Stands were marked and baseline data gathered in preparation for the thinning of 350 acres. Over 2,000 seedlings were planted in a site prep experiment, and as wildland planting. The wildland planting includes any seedlings that were planted outside of the pre-determined research sites

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